River of Death–The Chickamauga Campaign: Volume 1: The Fall of Chattanooga Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - The battle of chickamauga was the third bloodiest of the American Civil War and the only major Confederate victory in the conflict's western theater. It pitted braxton Bragg's Army of Tennessee against William S. He also sheds new light on the role of railroads on operations in these landlocked battlegrounds, as well as the intelligence gathered and used by both sides.

Delving deep into the strategic machinations, maneuvers, and smaller clashes that led to the bloody events of September [email protected]–20, 1863, Robertson reveals that the road to Chickamauga was as consequential as the unfolding of the battle itself. Drawing on all relevant primary and secondary sources, Robertson devotes special attention to the personalities and thinking of the opposing generals and their staffs.

River of Death--The Chickamauga Campaign: Volume 1: The Fall of Chattanooga Civil War America #ad - In this first volume of an authoritative two-volume history of the Chickamauga Campaign, William Glenn Robertson provides a richly detailed narrative of military operations in southeastern and eastern Tennessee as two armies prepared to meet along the "River of Death. Robertson tracks the two opposing armies from July 1863 through Bragg's strategic decision to abandon Chattanooga on September 9.

Rosecrans's army of the Cumberland and resulted in more than 34, 500 casualties.

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Conquered: Why the Army of Tennessee Failed Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - Drawing from his mastery of the relevant sources, Daniel's book is a thought-provoking reassessment of an army's fate, with important implications for Civil War history and military history writ large. Surpassing previous work that has focused on questions of command structure and the force's fate on the fields of battle, Daniel provides the clearest view to date of the army's inner workings, from top-level command and unit cohesion to the varied experiences of common soldiers and their connections to the home front.

But under the principal leadership of generals such as Braxton Bragg, Joseph E. Daniel offers a far richer interpretation. Operating in the vast and varied trans-Appalachian west, the Army of Tennessee was crucially important to the military fate of the Confederacy. Johnston, and john bell hood, it won few major battles, and many regard its inability to halt steady Union advances into the Confederate heartland as a matter of failed leadership.

Conquered: Why the Army of Tennessee Failed Civil War America #ad - Here, esteemed military historian Larry J.

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Fighting for Atlanta: Tactics, Terrain, and Trenches in the Civil War Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - As william T. He also illuminates the impact of fighting and living in ditches for four months on the everyday lives of both Union and Confederate soldiers. These engagements took place on topography ranging from Appalachian foothills to the clay fields of Georgia's piedmont. Leading military historian Earl J.

Hess examines how commanders adapted their operations to the physical environment, how the environment in turn affected their movements, and how Civil War armies altered the terrain through the science of field fortification. With 160, 000 troops engaged on both sides and hundreds of miles of trenches dug, fortifications became a defining factor in the Atlanta campaign battles.

Fighting for Atlanta: Tactics, Terrain, and Trenches in the Civil War Civil War America #ad - Sherman's union troops began their campaign for Atlanta in the spring of 1864, they encountered Confederate forces employing field fortifications located to take advantage of rugged terrain. While the confederates consistently acted on the defensive, digging eighteen lines of earthworks from May to September, the Federals used fieldworks both defensively and offensively.

The atlanta campaign represents one of the best examples of a prolonged Union invasion deep into southern territory, as Hess reveals, and, it marked another important transition in the conduct of war from open field battles to fighting from improvised field fortifications.

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A Campaign of Giants--The Battle for Petersburg: Volume 1: From the Crossing of the James to the Crater Civil War America

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - With new perspectives on operational and tactical choices by commanders, and the significant role of the United States Colored Troops in the fighting, the experiences of common soldiers and civilians, this book offers essential reading for all those interested in the history of the Civil War. Ulysses S.

Grinding, bloody, and ultimately decisive, the Petersburg Campaign was the Civil War's longest and among its most complex. Lee squared off for more than nine months in their struggle for Petersburg, the key to the Confederate capital at Richmond. A week later, Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House. Here A.

Full of fresh insights drawn from military, political, and social history, A Campaign of Giants is destined to be the definitive account of the campaign. After failing to bull his way into petersburg, Grant concentrated on isolating the city from its communications with the rest of the surviving Confederacy, stretching Lee's defenses to the breaking point.

A Campaign of Giants--The Battle for Petersburg: Volume 1: From the Crossing of the James to the Crater Civil War America #ad - Grant and Robert E. When lee's desperate breakout attempt failed in March 1865, Grant launched his final offensives that forced the Confederates to abandon the city on April 2, 1865. Wilson greene opens his sweeping new three-volume history of the Petersburg Campaign, taking readers from Grant's crossing of the James in mid-June 1864 to the fateful Battle of the Crater on July 30

. Featuring some of the war's most notorious battles, the campaign played out against a backdrop of political drama and crucial fighting elsewhere, with massive costs for soldiers and civilians alike.

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The Real Horse Soldiers: Benjamin Grierson's Epic 1863 Civil War Raid Through Mississippi

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Savas Beatie #ad - Gen. While Confederate Lt. Smith’s the real horse soldiers: benjamin Grierson’s Epic 1863 Civil War Raid through Mississippi rectifies this oversight. There were other simultaneous operations to distract Confederate attention from the real threat posed by U. The last serious study was published more than six decades ago.

Grierson’s operation, and for good reason: for 16 days april 17 to may 2 grierson led Confederate pursuers on a high-stakes chase through the entire state of Mississippi, however, mainly conducted with two Illinois cavalry regiments, has become the most famous, entering the northern border with Tennessee and exiting its southern border with Louisiana.

The Real Horse Soldiers: Benjamin Grierson's Epic 1863 Civil War Raid Through Mississippi #ad - Ironically, the man who led the raid was a former music teacher who some say disliked horses. Grant’s Army of the Tennessee. Smith’s the real horse soldiers captures the high drama and tension of the 1863 horse soldiers in a modern, comprehensive, academic study. Since then other accounts have appeared, but none are deeply researched full-length studies of the raid and its more than substantial and yet often overlooked results.

Benjamin grierson’s union cavalry thrust through Mississippi is one of the most well-known operations of the Civil War. Throughout, he displayed outstanding leadership and cunning, freed slaves, destroyed railroad tracks, burned trestles and bridges, and created as much damage and chaos as possible. Grierson’s raid broke a vital confederate rail line at Newton Station that supplied Vicksburg and, perhaps most importantly, consumed the attention of the Confederate high command.

John pemberton at vicksburg and other southern leaders looked in the wrong directions, the Confederate chances of holding the river, Grant moved his entire Army of the Tennessee across the Mississippi River below Vicksburg, spelling the doom of that city, and perhaps the Confederacy itself.

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Gettysburg's Peach Orchard: Longstreet, Sickles, and the Bloody Fight for the "Commanding Ground" Along the Emmitsburg Road

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Savas Beatie #ad - The occupation of the high ground at the Peach Orchard helped General Lee rationalize ordering the tragic July 3 assault known as “Pickett’s Charge. This richly detailed study is based upon scores of primary accounts and a deep understanding of the terrain. The confederate attack crushed the Peach Orchard salient and other parts of the Union line, threatening the left flank of Maj.

Hessler and isenberg, both gettysburg licensed Battlefield Guides, combine the military aspects of the fighting with human interest stories in a balanced treatment of the bloody attack and defense of Gettysburg’s Peach Orchard. However, Union Maj. Lee ordered skeptical subordinate Lt. Robert E. The command decisions made in and around the Sherfy property influenced actions on every part of the battlefield.

Gettysburg's Peach Orchard: Longstreet, Sickles, and the Bloody Fight for the "Commanding Ground" Along the Emmitsburg Road #ad - James hessler’s and britt isenberg’s gettysburg’s peach Orchard: Longstreet, Sickles, and the Bloody Fight for the “Commanding Ground” Along the Emmitsburg Road corrects that oversight. On july 2, 1863, Confederate Gen. The offensive was intended to seize the Peach Orchard and surrounding ground along the Emmitsburg Road for use as an artillery position to support the ongoing attack.

Despite its overriding importance, no full-length study of this pivotal action has been written until now. Gen.

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Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, September 18, 1863

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Savas Beatie #ad - That delay cost Bragg’s army the initiative at Chickamauga. Braxton bragg’s entire battle plan off its timetable by delaying his army’s advance for an entire day. It also includes a detailed walking and driving tour complete with the GPS coordinates, a trademark of Wittenberg’s recent works. Complete with more than 60 photos and 15 maps by master cartographer Mark Anderson Moore, Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, September 18, 1863 will be a welcome addition to the burgeoning Chickamauga historiography.

. Robert H. G. Minty and Col. In 2014, eric J. Wittenberg brings his expertise with Civil War cavalry operations to bear with vivid and insightful descriptions of the fighting and places the actions in their full and proper historic context. This thoroughly researched and well-written book includes three appendices—two orders of battle and a discussion of the historic context of some of the tactics employed by the Union mounted force on September 18, and an epilogue on how the War Department and National Park Service have remembered these events.

Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, September 18, 1863 #ad - Wittenberg published “the Devil’s to Pay”: John Buford at Gettysburg. Fast-forward four years to 2018 and wittenberg’s latest release, a companion Western Theater study entitled Holding the Line on the River of Death: Union Mounted Forces at Chickamauga, September 18, 1863. This volume focuses on the two important delaying actions conducted by mounted Union soldiers at Reed’s and Alexander’s bridges on the first day of Chickamauga.

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"Lee is Trapped, and Must be Taken": Eleven Fateful Days after Gettysburg: July 4 - 14, 1863

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Savas Beatie #ad - Lee had to keep his army organized and motivated enough to conduct an orderly withdrawal away from the field. The eleven-day period after gettysburg was a battle of wits to determine which commander better understood the information he received, and directed the movements of his army accordingly. Lee’s retreating Army of Northern Virginia.

Their respective commanders faced difficult tasks, including the rallying of their troops for more marching and fighting. Earnhart civil war scholarship awardcountless books have examined the battle of Gettysburg, but the retreat of the armies to the Potomac River and beyond has not been as thoroughly covered.

Central to the respective commanders’ decisions was the information they received from their intelligence-gathering resources about the movements, intentions, and capability of the enemy. Schaus goes a long way toward rectifying this oversight. This comprehensive study focuses on the immediate aftermath of the battle and addresses how Maj.

"Lee is Trapped, and Must be Taken": Eleven Fateful Days after Gettysburg: July 4 - 14, 1863 #ad - Meade faced the same organizational and motivational challenges, while assessing the condition of his victorious but heavily damaged army, to determine if it had sufficient strength to pursue and crush a still-dangerous enemy. Lee is trapped, and must be taken”: eleven fateful Days after Gettysburg: July 4 to July 14, 1863, by Thomas J.

Prepare for some surprising revelations. Woven into this account is the fate of thousands of Union prisoners who envisioned rescue to avoid incarceration in wretched Confederate prisons, and a characterization of how the Union and Confederate media portrayed the ongoing conflict for consumption on the home front.

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The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777 The Revolution Trilogy

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Henry Holt and Co. #ad - Now he turns his attention to a new war, and in the initial volume of the Revolution Trilogy he recounts the first twenty-one months of America’s violent war for independence. Rick atkinson has given stirring new life to the first act of our country’s creation drama. From the battles at lexington and concord in spring 1775 to those at Trenton and Princeton in winter 1777, American militiamen and then the ragged Continental Army take on the world’s most formidable fighting force.

From the bestselling author of the liberation trilogy comes the extraordinary first volume of his new trilogy about the American RevolutionRick Atkinson, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning An Army at Dawn and two other superb books about World War II, has long been admired for his deeply researched, stunningly vivid narrative histories.

It is a gripping saga alive with astonishing characters: henry knox, the self-made man who proves to be the wiliest of diplomats; George Washington, the blue-eyed bumpkin who becomes a brilliant battle captain; Benjamin Franklin, the former bookseller with an uncanny understanding of artillery; Nathanael Greene, the commander in chief who learns the difficult art of leadership when the war seems all but lost.

The British Are Coming: The War for America, Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777 The Revolution Trilogy #ad - The story is also told from the British perspective, making the mortal conflict between the redcoats and the rebels all the more compelling. Full of riveting details and untold stories, of sacrifice and blunder, The British Are Coming is a tale of heroes and knaves, of redemption and profound suffering.

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Union Command Failure in the Shenandoah: Major General Franz Sigel and the War in the Valley of Virginia, May 1864

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Savas Beatie #ad - The ramifications of the may 1864 engagement, which involved only 10, 000 troops, were substantial. It fell to union general and german transplant Franz Sigel to execute Grant’s strategy in the northern reaches of the Shenandoah while Maj. This methodology, however, neglects the other important factors that contributed to the ruin of Grant’s scheme in the Valley.

Union command failure in the Shenandoah delves into all the issues, analyzing the campaign from an operational standpoint. Complete with original maps, and the skillful writing readers have come to expect from the pen of David Powell, photos, Union Command Failure in the Shenandoah will satisfy the most demanding students of Civil War history.

Union Command Failure in the Shenandoah: Major General Franz Sigel and the War in the Valley of Virginia, May 1864 #ad - Grant regarded a spring campaign in the Valley of Virginia as integral to his overall strategy designed to turn Robert E. Breckinridge and his small army on May 15 just outside the crossroads town of New Market. The battle of new market in the Shenandoah Valley suffers from no lack of drama, interest, or importance.

Breckinridge’s command included some 300 young men from the Virginia Military Institute’s Corps of Cadets. John C. Vmi’s presence and dramatic role in the fighting ensured that New Market would never be forgotten, but pushed other aspects of this interesting and important campaign into the back seat of history.

Award-winning author david Powell’s years of archival and other research provides an outstanding foundation for this outstanding study.

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All Hell Can't Stop Them: The Battles for Chattanooga_Missionary Ridge and Ringgold, November 24-27, 1863 Emerging Civil War Series

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Savas Beatie #ad - Braxton bragg’s confederate army of tennessee still held Missionary Ridge, with other Rebels under James Longstreet threatening more Federals in Knoxville, Tennessee. Stubbornly, Bragg refused to retreat, and instead accepted battle. Thomas, and joseph Hooker—all moved to the attack. Each of grant’s assembled forces—troops led by Union Generals William T.

Grant did not share their certainty. Despite what grant’s many admirers would later insist was his most successful, most carefully planned battle, Grant’s strategy failed him—as did his most trusted commander, Sherman. All hell can’t stop them: the battles for chattanooga—missionary ridge and ringgold, 1863—sequel to battle Above the Clouds—details the dramatic final actions of the battles for Chattanooga: Missionary Ridge and the final Confederate rearguard action at Ringgold, November 24-27, where Patrick Cleburne held Grant’s Federals at bay and saved the Army of Tennessee from further disaster.

All Hell Can't Stop Them: The Battles for Chattanooga_Missionary Ridge and Ringgold, November 24-27, 1863 Emerging Civil War Series #ad - . Victory instead charged straight up the seemingly impregnable slopes of Missionary Ridge’s western face, as the men of the much-maligned Army of the Cumberland swarmed up and over Bragg’s defenses in an irresistible blue tide. Caught flat-footed by this impetuous charge, Grant could only watch nervously as the men started up.

For grant, the job he had been sent to accomplish was only half-finished. Sherman, George H.

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