That’s the Way It Is: A History of Television News in America

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University of Chicago Press #ad - The need for ratings success—and the lighter, human interest stories that can help bring it—Ponce de Leon makes clear, has always sat uneasily alongside a real desire to report hard news. Highlighting the contradictions and paradoxes at the heart of TV news, and telling a story rich in familiar figures and fascinating anecdotes, That’s the Way It Is will be the definitive account of how television has showed us our history as it happens.

It’s too dumbed-down, they say; it’s no longer news but entertainment, celebrity-obsessed and vapid. The critics may be right. The  familiar story of decline fails to acknowledge real changes in the media and Americans’ news-consuming habits, on closer examination, while also harking back to a golden age that, is revealed to be not so  golden after all.

That's the Way It Is: A History of Television News in America #ad - Ponce de leon explains in that’s the Way It Is, TV news has always walked a fine line between hard news and fluff. He shows us an industry forever in transition, where newsmagazines and celebrity profiles vie with political news and serious investigations. But, as Charles L. Ponce de leon traces the entire history of televised news, from the household names of the late 1940s and early ’50s, like Eric Sevareid, Edward R.

Murrow, the political power of fox News, through the rise of cable, and Walter Cronkite, and the satirical punch of Colbert and Stewart. When critics decry the current state of our public discourse, one reliably easy target is television news.

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Discovering The News: A Social History Of American Newspapers

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Basic Books #ad - Professor schudson analyzes the shifts in reportorial style over the years and explains why the belief among journalists and readers alike that newspapers must be objective still lives on. This instructive and entertaining social history of American newspapers shows that the very idea of impartial, objective “news” was the social product of the democratization of political, economic, and social life in the nineteenth century.

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The News Media: What Everyone Needs to Know®

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Oxford University Press #ad - The past several years have seen the newspaper industry in a state of crisis, with Twitter and Facebook ushering in the rise of citizen journalism and a deprofessionalization of the industry, plummeting readership and revenue, and municipal and regional papers shuttering or being absorbed into corporate behemoths.

The business of journalism has an extensive, storied, and often romanticized history. It addresses a wide range of questions, from whether objectivity was only a conceit of late twentieth century reporting, largely behind us now; how digital technology has disrupted journalism; whether newspapers are already dead to the role of non-profit journalism; the meaning of "transparency" in reporting; the way that private interests and governments have created their own advocacy journalism; whether social media is changing journalism; the new social rules of old media outlets; how franchised media is addressing the problem of disappearing local papers; and the rise of citizen journalism and hacker journalism.

The News Media: What Everyone Needs to Know® #ad - Newspaper reporting has long shaped the way that we see the world, played key roles in exposing scandals, and has even been alleged to influence international policy. It will even look at the ways in which new technologies potentially threaten to replace journalists. Now billionaires, most with no journalism experience but lots of power and strong views, are stepping in to purchase newspapers, both large and small.

This addition to the what everyone needs to know® series looks at the past, present and future of journalism, considering how the development of the industry has shaped the present and how we can expect the future to roll out.

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Mass Media Law

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McGraw-Hill Higher Education #ad - Students are offered an updated look at the ever-changing landscape of media law. Choose this option if your instructor will require Connect to be used in the course. Your subscription to connect includes the following: SmartBook® - an adaptive digital version of the course textbook that personalizes your reading experience based on how well you are learning the content.

Access to your instructor’s homework assignments quizzes syllabus notes reminders and other important files for the course. Progress dashboards that quickly show how you are performing on your assignments and tips for improvement. The option to purchase for a small fee a print version of the book. Led by a team of preeminent scholars in the field of mass media law: Clay Calvert Dan Kozlowski and Derigan Silver this new edition is engaging readable and entertaining.

Mass Media Law #ad - Instructors and students can now access their course content through the Connect digital learning platform by purchasing either standalone Connect access or a bundle of print and Connect access. Mcgraw-hill connect® is a subscription-based learning service accessible online through your personal computer or tablet.

This binder-ready loose-leaf version includes free shipping. Complete system requirements to use Connect can be found here: http://www. Mheducation. Com/highered/platforms/connect/training-support-students.

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Inside Reporting

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McGraw-Hill Higher Education #ad - Inside Reporting #ad - No other textbook offers a more engaging and accessible approach to newswriting than Inside Reporting. It also includes more useful advice on feature writing—from stories to reviews and column-writing—than any other textbook in the field. While emphasizing the basics this new edition offers a wealth of information on digital reporting and packaging stories in modern interactive ways.

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Troublemakers: Silicon Valley's Coming of Age

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Simon & Schuster #ad - Featured among well-known silicon valley innovators are mike markkula, who masterminded the personal computer; software entrepreneur Sandra Kurtzig, the underappreciated chairman of Apple who owned one-third of the company; Bob Taylor, who rose from the factory line to the executive suite; and Niels Reimers, the Atari engineer behind the first successful video game; Fawn Alvarez, the cofounder of Genentech; Al Alcorn, the first woman to take a technology company public; Bob Swanson, the Stanford administrator who changed how university innovations reach the public.

Acclaimed historian leslie berlin’s “deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley’s early years…is a meticulously told…compelling history” The New York Times of the men and women who chased innovation, and ended up changing the world. Troublemakers is the gripping tale of seven exceptional men and women, pioneers of Silicon Valley in the 1970s and early 1980s.

Troublemakers: Silicon Valley's Coming of Age #ad - In doing so, they changed the world. There is much to learn from berlin’s account, institutional capital, particularly that Silicon Valley has long provided the backdrop where technology, elite education, and entrepreneurship collide with incredible force” The Christian Science Monitor. In this vigorous account…a sturdy, atari, genentech, ask, rolm, as well as apple, skillfully constructed work” Kirkus Reviews, Xerox PARC, historian Leslie Berlin introduces the people and stories behind the birth of the Internet and the microprocessor, and the iconic venture capital firms Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers.

Together, industries, they worked across generations, and companies to bring technology from Pentagon offices and university laboratories to the rest of us. Together, these troublemakers rewrote the rules and invented the future.

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Temp: The Real Story of What Happened to Your Salary, Benefits, and Job Security

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Penguin Books #ad - As we make choices about the future, we need to understand our past. Now every working person in america today asks the same question: how secure is my job? In Temp, Louis Hyman explains how we got to this precarious position and traces the real origins of the gig economy: it was created not by accident, but by choice through a series of deliberate decisions by consultants and CEOs--long before the digital revolution.

Uber is not the cause of insecurity and inequality in our country, and neither is the rest of the gig economy. Winner of the William G. The answer to our growing problems goes deeper than apps, further back than outsourcing and downsizing, and contests the most essential assumptions we have about how our businesses should work.

Temp: The Real Story of What Happened to Your Salary, Benefits, and Job Security #ad - Bowen prize named a "triumph" of 2018 by new york times book criticsshortlisted for the 800-ceo-read business Book AwardThe untold history of the surprising origins of the "gig economy"--how deliberate decisions made by consultants and CEOs in the 50s and 60s upended the stability of the workplace and the lives of millions of working men and women in postwar America.

Over the last fifty years, job security has cratered as the institutions that insulated us from volatility have been swept aside by a fervent belief in the market.

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The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America

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Anchor #ad - Now, bamford describes the transformation of the NSA since 9/11, as the agency increasingly turns its high-tech gaze within America's borders. The shadow factory reconstructs how the nsa missed a chance to thwart two of the 9/11 hijackers and details how this mistake has led to a heightening of surveillance to insure that it never happens again.

Any reader who thinks america's liberties are being protected by Congress will be shocked and appalled at what is revealed here. National bestsellera washington post best book of the yearjames Bamford has been the preeminent expert on the National Security Agency since his reporting revealed the agency's existence in the 1980s.

The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America #ad - . In disturbing detail, bamford describes exactly how every American's data is being mined and by whom, and what is being done with it.

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Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing History of Computing

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The MIT Press #ad - By 1974, the british computer industry was all but extinct. How britain lost its early dominance in computing by systematically discriminating against its most qualified workers: women. In 1944, britain led the world in electronic computing. What happened in the intervening thirty years holds lessons for all postindustrial superpowers.

As computing experienced a gender flip, becoming male-identified in the 1960s and 1970s,  labor problems grew into structural ones and gender discrimination caused the nation's largest computer user—the civil service and sprawling public sector—to make decisions that were disastrous for the British computer industry and the nation as a whole.

Drawing on recently opened government files, personal interviews, and the archives of major British computer companies, Programmed Inequality takes aim at the fiction of technological meritocracy. Hicks explains why, even today, possessing technical skill is not enough to ensure that women will rise to the top in science and technology fields.

That failure sprang from the government's systematic neglect of its largest trained technical workforce simply because they were women. Programmed inequality shows how the disappearance of women from the field had grave macroeconomic consequences for Britain, and why the United States risks repeating those errors in the twenty-first century.

Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing History of Computing #ad - As britain struggled to use technology to retain its global power, the nation's inability to manage its technical labor force hobbled its transition into the information age. In programmed inequality, Mar Hicks explores the story of labor feminization and gendered technocracy that undercut British efforts to computerize.

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The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths

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PublicAffairs #ad - The world's most popular products, were funded not by private companies, from the iPhone to Google Search, but the taxpayer. Mazzucato teaches us how to reverse this trend before it is too late. The repercussions could stunt economic growth and increase inequality. A select few get credit for what is an intensely collective effort, and the US government has started disinvesting from innovation.

The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths #ad - . She reveals in detailed case studies that the opposite is true: the state is, and has been, our boldest and most valuable innovator. In this sharp and controversial international bestseller, an award-winning economist debunks the pervasive myth that the government is sluggish and inept, and at odds with a dynamic private sector.

Denying this history is leading us down the wrong path.

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Antisocial Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy

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Oxford University Press #ad - And it's an indictment of how "social media" has fostered the deterioration of democratic culture around the world, from facilitating Russian meddling in support of Trump's election to the exploitation of the platform by murderous authoritarians in Burma and the Philippines. In this fully updated paperback edition of antisocial media, while it may make personal life just a little more pleasurable, Siva Vaidhyanathan explains how Facebook devolved from an innocent social site hacked together by Harvard students into a force that, makes democracy a lot more challenging.

Antisocial Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy #ad - Both authoritative and trenchant, Antisocial Media shows how Facebook's mission went so wrong. It's an account of the hubris of good intentions, a missionary spirit, and an ideology that sees computer code as the universal solvent for all human problems. If you wanted to build a machine that would distribute propaganda to millions of people, distract them from important issues, undermine respectable journalism, erode social trust, foster doubts about science, energize hatred and bigotry, and engage in massive surveillance all at once, you would make something a lot like Facebook.

Of course, none of that was part of the plan.

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